Posted: Aug 9 2008

 Tellinella listeri (Röding, 1798), Speckled Tellin

Tlis
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Tlisteri9
Tlisteri9
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Tlisteri7
Tlisteri7
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Tlisteri8
Tlisteri8
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Posted: Apr 30 2013, LYS Forum member bullas1:

I posted on conch-l* about Tellina interrupta,data said Gulf of Mexico. The T.interrupta is now T.listeri. With the feed back I got from conch-l I have scaned the T.listeri with the other Tellina from Gulf of Mexico.

Could the bottom shell be T.mexicana 31.2mm ? Top shell is T.listeri 61.8mm I collected at Jupiter,Florida.

Harry:  Yes

Marlo:

4/29/13 bullas (Ammie Powers, Jr.) posted on Conch-L:

"I have 4 shells listed as Tellina interrupla,Gulf of Mexico. They range from 23.2 to 32.7mm. I can find no record of this name. They look somewhat like
Tellina listeri.

Can anyone shed some light on these shells or the name?"


Steve Rosenthal:

"malacolog database is always good to look for possible synonymy, here seems to be no exception....

Bivalvia: Euheterodonta: Tellinoidea: Tellininae

Tellinella listeri (Röding, 1798)

Synonymy
Tellina listeri Röding, 1798
Tellina interrupta W. Wood, 1815
Tellina maculosa Lamarck, 1818
Tellina mexicana Petit, 1841
Tellina antonii Philippi, 1844"


Carole Marshall:

"The only thing I would say differently is that Marcus Huber, in personal conversation said Tellina mexicana has been taken out of synonymy. It would help to check your specimens. In a personal conversation with him, he said the photo in Harry Lee's book is listeri, while the photo in Mikkelsen & Bieler's S. Florida Bivalves book is mexicana. I guess it all goes back to are you a lumper or splitter. I do not know if any DNA studies have been done on these two or not. Peggy Williams sold me a T. Mexicana at the last Jamboree. There isn't much difference. Maybe a Tellina expert can shed more light on this subject."


Harry Lee:

"T. mexicana has a lesser H/W ratio than its sibling ...

Markus Huber will not publish the tellinid (and other families) final edition until ~2015, but it appears that Tellinella mexicana (Petit de la Saussaye, 1841) may be the Caribbean, and T. listeri (Röding, 1798) the Carolinian element, of
a species tandem, but the zoogeography may not be 'just so,' e.g., http://www.jaxshells.org/tlist.htm


I presume Markus will synonymize Tellina interrupta W. Wood, 1815 and T. maculosa Lamarck, 1818 with T. listeri Röding, 1798. I'm not up on T. antonii Philippi, 1844.

Linguistic paradox notwithstanding, it seems to me that material collected in the Gulf of Mexico will more likely belong to T. listeri than T. mexicana.

Does that sound right, Jr.?"


Bullas:

"Thanks to all for the help.
First thing I seen was the mis-spelling on the data slip. Harry these were some other shells I got in the box with the Parahyotissa rosea from back in the 60's. I have compaired the so called T.interrupta with T.listeri many times and find no difference except,the smaller ones have more and deeper color than the larger ones."


Harry:

"Markus Huber responded to my last post, and he has added:

(1) Tellina antonii Philippi, 1844 = T. mexicana
Petit de la Saussaye, 1841. This synonymy was first pointed out by Bertin (1879).

(2) T. listeri and T.mexicana overlap much more extensively in their ranges than I presumed. Brazil is home to only the latter.

(3) Nineteenth Century authors recognized the distinction between the above pair; Dall mistakenly synonymized them, and, until now, most authorities have followed him.

(4) Full descriptions, etc. will appear in the upcoming second volume of Huber"

For more: http://www.listserv.uga.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A2=...conch-l&P=R2208


Peggy Williams:

"I noticed years ago that the Tellina I was getting offshore of Tampa and Sarasota was considerably different from the usual Caribbean one. I found a reference to T. mexicana as a fossil in our area so I am using that name for these shells. They are, as Harry pointed out, smaller, with more purple markings, and more slender than T. listeri."